This website is intended for Medical Professionals only. By using this site you confirm that you are a healthcare professional.

News
Smokers Are At High Risk for Low Back Pain, ... Smokers are at high risk for low back pain, and also have higher ... (20 Feb 2019)
Temperatures Rising: Patients Taking ... Patients taking diuretics are often at risk for low potassium ... (20 Feb 2019)
Hormone therapy may increase cardiovascular ... Patients receiving hormone therapy as part of their ... (20 Feb 2019)
Avoiding Selfie Elbow, Texting Thumb Specialists are seeing more and more repetitive stress injuries ... (20 Feb 2019)
Adolescent Female Blood Donors At Risk For ... New public health measures could help protect this vulnerable ... (20 Feb 2019)
Wednesday, 21 November 2018 19:37

Probiotic No Better Than Placebo for Acute Gastroenteritis in Children Featured

Rate this item
(0 votes)

While probiotics are often used to treat acute gastroenteritis in children, the latest evidence shows no significant differences in outcomes, compared to a placebo. These results come from the large, double-blind, randomized controlled trial conducted at 10 geographically diverse U.S. pediatric emergency departments. Findings were published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

“This study presents the most robust evidence to date that use of probiotics does not improve outcomes of acute gastroenteritis in children, which calls into question current recommendations,” says author Elizabeth Powell, MD, MPH, pediatric emergency medicine specialist at Lurie Children’s and Professor of Pediatrics at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. “Recommendations to use probiotics for these patients were based on previous meta-analyses that have suggested probiotics may be beneficial, but the trials that were included had significant limitations. The rigor of our research design and our results warrant reconsideration of common practice.”

Acute gastroenteritis, which can present with diarrhea, vomiting and abdominal pain is the second leading cause of death worldwide in children younger than 5 years.

The study included 943 children, aged 3 months to 4 years of age. Two weeks after an emergency department visit for acute gastroenteritis, children in the study who received a five-day course of probiotic (Lactobacillus rhamnosus) fared no better than the placebo group in terms of illness severity, duration and frequency of diarrhea or vomiting, day-care absenteeism and rate of household transmission of the infection.



Source Newsroom: Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Read 277 times Last modified on Wednesday, 21 November 2018 19:53

Latest news

Highlights

Join

Connect with other Medical Professionals on fb in a closed facebook group

Login

Top
We use cookies to improve our website. By continuing to use this website, you are giving consent to cookies being used. More details…