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Breast cancer cells that spread to other parts of the body break off and leave the primary tumour at late stages of disease development, scientists from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators have found.

Published in Medical News

Ionizing radiation, such as x-rays, has a harmful effect on the cardiovascular system even at doses equivalent to recurrent CT imaging, a new study published in the International Journal of Radiation Biology suggests.

Published in Medical News

A method for predicting someone’s ‘brain age’ based on MRI scans could help to spot who might be at increased risk of poor health and even dying at a younger age.

Published in Medical News

Screening for prostate cancer is controversial. It can save lives, but it can also lead to unnecessary diagnoses, followed by surgical or radiation procedures, which themselves may lead to severe side-effects. Now a new study, coming from the Dutch part of the European Randomised study for the Screening of Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) has found that MRI-based screening can reduce overdiagnosis by 50% and reduce unnecessary biopsies by 70%, potentially changing the equation for prostate cancer screening. This work, the first to confirm that the use of MRI in a population-based screening setting may be viable, and was presented at the EAU conference in London.

Published in Medical News

Through computed tomography (CT) images of the heart and other types of imaging, build-up of dangerous coronary plaques—which restrict the flow of blood to the heart—can be detected, even before a person develops symptoms of heart disease. Because of this, there is increasing interest in using these imaging techniques to screen for heart disease. According to a review published today in JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, a simple CT imaging technique called a coronary artery calcium (CAC) scan—often referred to as a “calcium scan”—may be particularly useful when screening for coronary artery disease.

Published in Medical News


New heart disease "staging" system focuses on those previously considered at low risk

Experts at Johns Hopkins and New York's Mount Sinai Health System have published a suggested new plan for a five-stage system of classifying the risk of heart attack in those with heart disease, one they say puts much-needed and long-absent focus on the risks faced by millions of Americans who pass so-called stress tests or have less obvious or earlier-stage danger signs.

Published in Medical News
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